fine art and private & home school K-12th grades Christian art curriculum
supporting the grammar, dialectic, and rhetoric stages of Classical education

FAQ's About

Spears Art Studio K-8 Christian Art Curriculum, A Teacher's Manual©
Teach your children art
from a Biblical worldview (perspective).

Spears Art Studio K-8 Christian Art Curriculum, A Teacher's Manual, is so adaptable that it can be formatted for use in any educational setting and grade level. It is intended to last a MINIMUM of 9 years for students beginning its use in Kindergarten. But its usefulness continues beyond that, because there is more material than any grade level can use in one year. Most educators pick and choose lessons and themes that correspond with other studies. Some simply choose favorites.

Q. Will we need a student manual in addition to the teacher's manual?
A.
No, you don't need a student book, unless you want to supplement the program with other activities. You are welcome to print the entre curriculum, while adhering to the Limited Copyright Notice. The K-8 has 269 art activities to choose from (one for each grade level per week for most weeks) and recommendations for finding famous art examples from the library and/or internet that provide the art history/appreciation and that illustrate the weekly theme and individual lessons. Each lesson provides the instructor with preparation information and motivational ideas for the students.

Q. What do I use for art images if I can't find the ones listed in the lesson?
A.
The internet is a greats source - “google” the name of the artist and the image. Web sites sometimes relacate or remove mage , but most have not. Find the web sites for the National Gallery of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and many others. Many museums have actual art lessons based on their collections that can supplement your program. Museums also sell post cards of well-known images from their collections. The large poster books of famous artists’ work are valuable resources found in discount and used book stores.

Q. What sources other than the library can I use for art images?
A.
Finding artists and images is easy on the internet with Google. There will soon be available on this web site a PDF file of an Image Source List to help you search the internet. In the meantime, simply "google" the artists and images. If you wish to purchase images to reuse from year to year, you may find the web sites for the National Gallery of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, allposters.com and many others. Many museums have actual art lessons based on their collections that can supplement your program. Museums also sell post cards of well-known images from their collections. The large poster books of famous artists' work are valuable resources found in discount and used book stores as well as web sites that sell individual posters.

Q. Does the entire K-8 manual need to be presented in one school year?
A.
A resounding NO! The purpose of the manual is to give students experiences that cover a wide range of media and processes. Do not rush through any lesson just to give them an art activity if the quality of study and products will be compromised. The goal is real learning, not just covering material. Even though the curriculum is more-or-less seasonally arranged, you may pick and choose units to fit your core curriculum without loss of art education continuity. It is recommended that you not skip September or October due to the drawing foundation in most lessons. Each lesson can be extended to another session. Always feel free to adapt any program to the needs of your students.

Q. I have all the grades for art. Can I combine grade levels to present one lesson to all so that it cuts down on my preparation time?
A.
Many lessons can be presented and adapted to more than the designated grade level, even though the lessons presented in the manual are arranged so that there is a gradual progression of learning. Students learn at their own level anyway. Some lessons are more interesting to specific grade levels, as you will discover. If you teach only one or two grades, the recommendation is to adhere to the specific grade level activities. The main goal is to give the information in the theme, the Scripture connection, and then to present the activity that reinforces that information. In this way, the K-8 manual may be used many years without repetition of activities. Repetition of the themes each year reinforces and builds on the learning process, especially in understanding how Scripture connects with the students' lives.

Q. What kind of outside costs for the projects would there be? I know you may not have a specific cost, but we're a small school and we don't have too much in the way of an art budget.
A.
The projects for the most part use standard art materials that most art rooms have or students have: white drawing paper, construction paper, pencils, crayons, markers, tempera paint, brushes, glue, etc. Only a very few activities require other materials. These can be donated: yarn, sewing notions, paper towel tubes, miscellaneous "stuff", etc.; or substituted: baker's clay for self-hardening clay, etc. Several activities use scraps of paper left over from other projects. There are a few extra items that must be purchased: Elmer's Glue-All, some white and colored poster board, and Sharpie black permanent markers. In the Appendix are two materials lists: one list by grade levels to purchase all materials at once, and the other list by activity to purchase supplies a few at a time.

Q. Can a teacher with minimal art knowledge teach the lessons in this curriculum?
A.
A teacher with minimal art experience can use these lessons. One of my purposes for writing the curriculum was to encourage parents and classroom teachers to incorporate art into their schedules, not as a time-filler, but as real support for their core curriculum, for brain development, and for personal enrichment. Many parents and teachers had confessed to me that they felt unqualified to teach art. Therefore, there are many helps for the educator in the Introduction especially.

Q. Is Preparation time overwhelming?
A.
The educator should not find preparation time to be overwhelming. The same weekly theme for all grades helps, plus an educator may combine grade levels for one activity and simply adjust the level of difficulty. However, you will find that some activities are more interesting to specific grade levels than to others. Also, some themes may be extended to another week. Always feel free to adjust the curriculum to your needs.

Q. Does the skill level build upon itself from year to year?
A.
From year to year, the main weekly themes are repeated, but the activities do increase in skill level as students progress academically. It is helpful to change the Scripture reference from time to time, or if two Scriptures are offered for a theme, use them alternately from year to year. Repetition for K-8 is invaluable. The activities are created with success in mind, but to still be slightly challenging. In any group, family, or classroom, there is a great variety of skill level, so an educator may have to encourage some students to practice basic hand coordination skills, such as cutting accurately with scissors.

Q. Will the students be repeating the same project that's just a little more difficult each year, or are the students learning new things each year?
A.
Only the weekly theme information is repeated, which an educator can always vary or abbreviate for students who have heard the info before, or have students relate the remembered information. The activities are different for each grade level based on that weekly theme with the exception of a few painting projects. Paintings always come out differently as students mature.

Q. Is the curriculum suitable for HOMESCHOOL art education?
A.
Definitely, yes. The art lessons and activities may be adjusted to any study schedule to cooperate with the requirements of other studies.

Q. How does the curriculum support the Classical Education Model (The Trivium)?
A.
The elementary (grammar) level supports the basic learning and memorization of facts by providing vocabulary and images of famous artworks. At the logical (didactic) level, students are encouraged to apply the higher order thinking skills to analyzing famous art works and determining if their own artworks fulfill the objectives of the lesson and to follow and understand logical steps in the production of successful artwork. It is at the discretion of the educator how much of the provided material is used to support the Classical Model.


















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